Ursula’s Hawaiian Adventure

I just ordered a hardcover book called Hollywood to Honolulu, The Story of the Los Angeles Steamship Company. I can’t wait to see the photographs and read about the ships Ursula sailed on to and from Hawaii. In the meantime, from the book’s promotional material, below is a description of the joyful L.A. harbor departure that Ursula and her friend Elizabeth would have experienced on January 14, 1928:

S.S. City of Honolulu

The S.S. City of Honolulu

“For over a decade during the Roaring Twenties, a great white ocean liner would sail from berth 156 in Los Angeles every Saturday. The pier was packed with waving and cheering people looking up at the happy passengers crowding the railings. The vessel’s band on deck played jazz tunes and popular favorites. The captain stood forward on the bridge wing watching the lowering of the gangway amid a hail of colored streamers and confetti. The liner’s whistle would blow at noon, raising the cheering to a higher pitch as the band played ‘Aloha Oe.’ Slowly the great mass of the liner inched away from the dock.”

cloche hats 1920s

Cloche hats were popular in the 1920s

Can’t you just see Ursula leaning over the ship’s railing, laughing with excitement, one hand on cloche hat while waving with the other to her smiling, yet tearful, mother down on the dock?

In my last post, I imagined Ursula aboard the S.S. City of Honolulu sipping cocktails with Elizabeth and young gentlemen admirers. Despite Prohibition, which lasted from 1920 to 1933, many of the ship’s passengers would have indeed enjoyed imbibing. According to a Los Angeles Times article about the vessel’s sister ship, S.S. City of Los Angeles:

Elizabeth Everyhardy passport photo

Ursula’s friend Elizabeth Everhardy (1924 passport photo)

“During Prohibition, travelers had a strong reason to board a ship that made a monthly voyage. Although liquor was supposedly banned from the ship, the City of Los Angeles held nightly cocktail parties in a library devoid of books.”

After six days at sea aboard the City of Honolulu, one of the first sights Ursula would have seen as the luxurious liner approached Honolulu Harbor was the new 10-story Aloha Tower. Built in 1926 to welcome arriving passenger ships, this lighthouse/clock tower was the tallest structure in Hawaii at the time, and still stands today as a historic landmark and iconic symbol of Hawaiians’ hospitality.

Illustration of the S.S. City of Honolulu arriving in Honolulu Harbor, with the Aloha Tower depicted on the right

Vintage illustration of the S.S. City of Honolulu arriving in Honolulu Harbor, with the Aloha Tower depicted on the right

In his interesting paper “Creating ‘Paradise of the Pacific’: How Tourism Began in Hawaii,” University of Hawai’i professor James Mak describes the over-the-top welcome Ursula, Elizabeth, and their fellow passengers would have received as their ship neared the shore on January 20, 1928:

SS_City_of_Honolulu_Illustration

Vintage illustration of the S.S. City of Honolulu entering Honolulu Harbor

“Reminiscent of ‘Steamer Days’ from many decades earlier, ‘Boat Days’ would be celebrated beginning in the late 1920s to welcome passenger liners arriving at the Aloha Tower in Honolulu. Ships were met by swarms of lei-bearing greeters, newspaper reporters were on hand to interview dignitaries, female dancers performed hula to Hawaiian music played by the Royal Hawaiian Band, and outrigger canoes and coin divers circled the ships. Each arrival became a festive occasion, and it has been reported that many locals left work early to take part in the festivities.”

Unfortunately, there are no photographs from Ursula’s Hawaiian adventure, but here is a short home movie (with period music) taken by another tourist visiting Hawaii that same year; Ursula probably saw some of these same or similar sights:

Film highlights include entering Honolulu Harbor (at the beginning); ­hula dancing (2:18); ‘Iolani Palace (4:24); coastline (5:20); beautiful park-like grounds of a hotel (5:35); Hawaiian boy diving and catching coin (5:48); majestic palm tree (6:10); sugar cane plantation (6:22); and driving in the mountains (7:21).

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Hawaiian Teaser

S.S. City of Honolulu

Ursula and her friend traveled to Hawaii aboard the S.S. “City of Honolulu” in January 1928

 

 

On Saturday, January 14, 1928 in Los Angeles, Ursula and her friend Elizabeth Everhardy boarded the S.S. City of Honolulu, bound for a Hawaiian holiday. I look forward to telling you more about Ursula’s trip, but unfortunately, my schedule has been so busy that I haven’t had as much time to devote to her story as I would like! Please stay tuned.

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Ursula Honored at Friend’s Party

LA Times article on Everhardy luncheon

The “Los Angeles Times” reports on a luncheon thrown by Ursula’s friend Elizabeth Everyhardy (March 27, 1927)

The next news we have of Ursula since her singing on KFWB radio comes from the “Society” column in the March 27, 1927 issue of the Los Angeles Times. Apparently, Ursula was a guest of honor at a luncheon and bridge party given by “Mrs. and Miss Everhardy,” who were longtime friends of the Cheshires. The first mention I found of them in my research was when Ursula’s parents attended a party at their house in February 1909. In June 1916 when Ursula was 14 years old, she was among about “fifty or more of the younger set” who were invited to a surprise dance party for her friend Elizabeth (“Miss Everhardy”).

Sixty-four people were invited to the 1927 luncheon, described as “one of the lovely affairs of the month.” Ursula’s mother, Clara, assisted the hostesses with the party, which included prizes for card games.

Light on fact checking, the news article noted that Ursula had “just returned from several years in Paris, France, where she has been studying voice culture…” As we know, Ursula did study voice culture, but it was in Southern France, and she was abroad just from May 1924 through June 1925, possibly returning to Paris briefly in 1926 to appear in divorce court.

Held at the Elks lodge in Los Angeles, the Everhardys’ event featured lovely décor:

“A spring motif was charmingly carried out in the table decorations, and the tall blue tapers were tied with fluffy bows of yellow tulle, following out a blue and gold color motif, while the place cards were hand-painted sketches of spring maids in all the dainty French colorings.”

Elks Temple 99

The Elks lodge where Ursula attended her friend’s party

Constructed just two years earlier, the Elks’ Art Deco building was later transformed into a luxurious hotel, the Park Plaza, which, according to its website, still stands but is used “exclusively for events and filming.”

Until next time…

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